Charitable Deductions: Individuals Going to the Limit

Charitable DedutionsThe leaves are changing and the weather is getting cooler, and people are starting to think about the upcoming holiday season. We all know it will be here before we know it, and it is the time to give to those less fortunate then us. Charitable giving by individual donors accounts for 75% of all US giving according to recent reports by Blackbaud Inc. and Atlas of Giving, national organization that provide analysis trends over charitable giving in the United States.

Charitable giving as defined by the IRS as a contribution or gift to, or for the use of the following:

  • A state, but only if the contribution is made exclusively for public purposes, such as a gift to reduce the public debt.
  • A corporation, trust community chest, fund, or foundation that is created or organized in the United States exclusively for religious, charitable, scientific, literary, educational purpose, to foster national or international amateur sports competition, for the prevention of cruelty to children or animals, for war veterans, an auxiliary unit or society of, or as a trust or foundation for an entity.
  • A cemetery company owned and operated for the benefit of its members or a corporation chartered solely for burial purposes.
  • A domestic fraternal society, order or association operating under the lodge system, but only if the contributions is exclusively used for purposes stated above.

Once you know to whom you want to give your donation, it is important to know how much you can deduct on your taxes. When giving charitable donation, if an individual gives 20% or less of their adjusted gross income then there is no limit considerations. Depending on the type of donation and organization, there may be a limit of 20%, 30% or 50%.

There are very stringent documentation rules that govern donations. You must have a record of the amount of the donation and how the donation was made, example: cash, noncash, or out-of-pocket expense. Some documentation that works is bank statements, credit card statements, written communication from the organization, payroll deduction record. These must have the amount donated and the name of the organization.

By knowing the legal restrictions and regulations governing charitable giving, the process is easier for everyone. Having a good, trusted financial advisor to help is always the best course of action when making large donations.

Here at Crowley & Halloran CPA’s, our consultants would be happy to help you plan and manage your business budget. Click here to request a proposal.

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